Daedalian completes two more glass design projects

 

Daedalian’s surveys and installations team were out on the road again last week to complete a couple of projects in the South of England. These two projects, although not the largest in terms of size or design complexity, serve well to demonstrate the range of glass designs that Daedalian Glass Studios is commissioned for.

 

Kensington studio project

Studio conversion in Kensington

Firstly, the team went down to London to work on a studio conversion in Kensington. For this project, Daedalian was commissioned for a handmade, bespoke door and partition wall to form the WC and shower area of the master bedroom en-suite.

This contemporary design features panels of double sided mirror, sandblasted glass, and clear glass of various sizes held within a stainless steel framework. The stainless steel was fabricated by one of our trusted partners before Daedalian created the glass components and installed the finished piece.

 

 

Wiltshire Parish Church project

Parish Church, Wiltshire

Following this, the team travelled across South England to Tisbury in Wiltshire. Here Daedalian were commissioned by a Parish Church to create a glass door with an integrated etched motif.

This project was difficult from a design perspective as the style and tradition of the centuries old Grade 1 listed building needed to be maintained whilst utilising modern materials and methods.

Additionally, safety glass was required for this project and this presented a technical difficulty when creating the etched motif design. Etching too deeply into the safety glass would compromise its structural integrity so a multi-depth and multi-sided design was created – allowing detail to be achieved without the use of deep etching.

Further to this, the project was particularly interesting due to the challenge of integrating the glass seamlessly with the aged and uneven stonework. This meant that the first requirement was a laser survey to ascertain the exact shape of the wall.

The laser survey was then used to digitally produce a 3D model of the hallway using CAD design software. The exact shape of the required glass was then plotted using this 3D model and CNC cut, allowing for a maximum space of 4mm for the stonework at any point.

When planning the installation of this project, it also posed the question of design vs functionality. Whilst stainless steel fittings were required to fix the heavy glass doors to the stonework, they slightly diminished the visual aesthetic of the clear glass against the stone. A balance was therefore struck by carefully planning the placement of the fixings to use the minimum required whilst ensuring structural stability.

Notes

To see more glass design projects by Daedalian, view their portfolio.

 

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