The Glass Academy Launches New Educational Resources

screenshot of one of the resources

Through our training and skills development initative, The Glass Academy, we have recently launched a range of free, glass-based educational resources aimed at 11-12 year old school pupils.

The resources, aimed at Year 7 and 8 pupils, have been developed in conjunction with teachers to ensure they are suitable for use within a classroom environment and linked to the national curriculum.

The four self-contained mini interactive resources have been created for use on desktop computers or tablets and enable students to learn at their own pace. They can be found on The Glass Academy website http://theglassacademy.org/education/teachers/resources enabling easy access for students and teachers.

The resources focus on the key locations for glass manufacture in the UK, the raw materials used to make glass, controlling the furnace and the inspection process. These interactions link to several different subjects and topics related to the national curriculum, including physical geography and geology, chemical reactions, maths formulas and equations, basic engineering principles and physics topics such as forces, pressure and refraction.

For example, students will learn about how raw materials affect the characteristics of an end product, such as how the iron content of sand can produce green glass, as well as through furnace monitoring, the importance of being vigilant in the workplace and maintaining high standards to ensure a quality product.

A fun and engaging interactive game based on a simple ‘coin catching’ concept, which has been tested out by over 200 enthusiastic pupils already, has also been developed, engaging with pupils through a medium they associate with and use in their free time.

A teacher from Tapton High School in Sheffield said: “It’s vital that we use real world examples when teaching the national curriculum as students are able to understand how their learning can be applied to authentic situations in the workplace. Manufacturing industries such as glass contribute heavily to the UK’s economy and it’s important for young people to understand how these industries and the products they make contribute to society. We think the resources are fantastic and will bring numerous chemistry, maths and physics topics to life for our students.”

Dave Dalton, CEO of British Glass, added: “The Glass Academy has been heavily involved in developing relationships between education and industry so we were delighted to take-up the opportunity to develop these free educational resources. The interactive nature of the materials aims to keep students engaged and learning about new topics in a fun way will create awareness of the glass industry and hopefully inspire the next generation into careers in manufacturing”
 

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On average, every family in
the UK uses around 330 glass
bottles and jars each year.


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