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TEC 7 - Strength and Performance Standards for the Use of Carbonated Beverage Bottles

TEC 7 - Strength and Performance Standards for the Use of Carbonated Beverage Bottles

TEC 7 gives guidance to bottlers, packers, merchants and users of glass containers for carbonated beverages, in the broadest sense.

  • Part 1 explains the principal and technical terms used in glass container manufacture, in filling and packing operations.
  • Part 2 contains a Code of Practice which has been established for manufactures of glass containers with a view to ensuring that an acceptable quality of bottles for carbonated products is maintained.
  • Part 3 describes precautions and recommendations for fillers, packers, retailers and others who supply and use the filled containers.

Although the contents are in no way mandatory, the aim of the booklet is to give guidance to all concerned regarding the manufacture and use of carbonated beverage bottles made by conventional techniques and covering the normal methods of bottling and distribution. If it is intended to depart from normal practice, either in container design or manufacture, or in filling, packaging, distribution or marketing, then any necessary additional control and precautions must be discussed between the parties involved. Glass bottles of a nominal capacity of greater than 1.15 litre (1150 ml) are not recommended for packaging carbonated soft drinks or carbonated water. Glass bottles are not recommended for packaging soft drinks where carbonation pressures exceed 4.7 bars, except in the case of refillable bottles with a nominal capacity no greater than 180 ml, where carbonation pressure up to 5.3 bars may be used. The document also addresses the responsibility of glass manufacturers regarding legislation such as the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Consumer Protection Act 1987. The Consumer Protection Act 1987 provides that a product is defective when its safety is not such as persons are generally entitled to expect. When deciding whether a product is defective, the way in which the product is marketed, the instructions and warnings accompanying it, and what might reasonably be expected to be done with it. It is for this reason that all refillable bottles designed since March 1988 have indicated, either by words or signs, that they are refillable and users of glass containers are recommended to consider incorporating words such as “do not re-use” on labels of all non-refillable containers. This is to try and prevent misuse of such containers for purposes for which they were not designed. In the case of carbonated beverages in particular, British Glass recommends that all packages for carbonated products, whether they be metal, plastic or glass, should carry a guidance note to advise the retailer and consumer

Current version: 2012  (electronic)

Priced at £30 per copy, but available to British Glass Members free of charge.

Free download only available for British Glass members.
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Many glass making terms have entered the language: 'Shut yer gob': a molten lump of glass is called a 'gob' to which the glass blower attached a tube to blow the glass into shape. The blower had to blow hard which made his cheeks very large. Today someone with a big mouth is told they have a big gob.


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